Gender pay gap in charity sector

Recent research claims that the gender pay gap in the charity sector is higher than the private sector.

Womens-equalityTPP Recruitment conducted four surveys among almost 1,500 voluntary sector workers and results show that the pay gap has more than doubled in the past two years, from 7 per cent in 2013 to 16.7 per cent in 2015.

This means that on average, for every £1 earned by a man in the voluntary sector, a woman will earn 83p and TPP says this is due to the lack of women in senior management. Only 32 per cent of charity chief executives are female. At directorship role, the gender pay gap was 22 per cent.

Calculations are based on data from the following charity employees: 127 respondents in human resources; 163 respondents in finance; 783 respondents in marketing and communications; 416 respondents and fundraising.

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Gender pay gap in charity sector

4 steps to becoming a data driven company

03Big data is a growing industry and data driven companies are quickly becoming more valuable as they take more informed decisions and increase their bottom line. Large corporations have been leveraging information to their advantage for some time. But big data is not only for big companies – organisations of any size can become data driven.

Here are some of our tips on how to become a data driven company:

  1.  Identify your data needs

Talk to the stakeholders in your company or department to identify what data can help facilitate better decisions. Is it customer data? Employee related data? Product data? Chances are that you already have that data in the company or could buy it in. Continue reading “4 steps to becoming a data driven company”

4 steps to becoming a data driven company

Are Government measures to reduce the gender pay gap failing women over 40?

The Women and Equalities Committee has launched an inquiry to inform Government strategy on reducing the gender pay gap.

More and more companies are thinking about their gender pay gap as the Government is set to announce its proposals to tackle the gender pay gap in early 2016.

Currently the gap between all male and female employees stands at 19.1% (2014), measured by median gross hourly pay. For all full time employees the gender pay gap is 9.4%, but there are wide variations by age and sector.

Younger women, from 18-39, in full-time work experience a very low or even reversed gender pay gap. ONS data shows the gap for hourly earnings growing from the age of 40 onwards. It is greatest for women in their 50s. This is partly due to the fact that half of women over 50 work part-time, and hourly wages for part-time workers are significantly lower than those for full-time employees. Continue reading “Are Government measures to reduce the gender pay gap failing women over 40?”

Are Government measures to reduce the gender pay gap failing women over 40?